ePetition – average speed cams

You will know about the latest tragedy on the Roger Penny Way last week – an ePetition has been set up. .
https://democracy.newforest.gov.uk/mgEPetitionDisplay.aspx?ID=25&RPID=3218860&HPID=3218860&%24LO%24=1&fbclid=IwAR04pwBx93bKe1nte8xIAtTgkKKpQp5R3x_aFZXGMh1Sv0CAmJbcBgBhGYU

Online learning – help for youngsters

The Ellingham, Harbridge and Ibsley Parish Council is keen to help children within the Parish who might be having difficulties accessing online learning. Yes, this is a privileged area and most children will be well provided for, however there may well be some who are in need. The Parish Council may be able to help, PLEASE, if you know a family that are struggling with the equipment they need share this information with them.

NFDC New Coronavirus Lockdown

New coronavirus lockdown just announced

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has this evening announced tougher coronavirus restrictions in England from tonight (one-minute past midnight on 5 January 2021).

The new set of lockdown restrictions for England has been introduced to stop the current fast spread of coronavirus which has reached a record high.

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Grant Applications 2020

Your Parish Council makes monetary grants to a number of organisations each year. Churches, Youth Groups, Community Service Organisations etc. have benefitted from such assistance in the past. Preference is given to requests for projects that assist residents and help to maintain services that might otherwise be underfunded.

Due to various reasons including Covid-19 consideration of grants has been delayed in 2020 and applications will be considered during the next Council Meeting on Jan. 26th 2021. There is still time to get an application in.

The application form is linked below, it is a pdf file or as an alternative you can download a docx file for those with Microsoft office or other means to open and edit such files.

Uncontrolled Dog

This item from the Hyde Neighborhood Watch

I am very sorry to have to report that “Shadow” our favourite alpaca was attacked at 0750 this morning by a grey Staffordshire Bull Terrier type dog in the paddock behind our house in Furze Hill. 

We heard noises of the struggle, and when we went out to investigate the dog, which had been gripping Shadow around the jaw, ran off towards Gorley Common. The dog had no collar and there was no sign or sound of an owner.

Shadow’s jaw had been smashed into several pieces and his face had been ripped wide open.  He was in pain and very distressed. When the vet came, she had no option but to put him down.

If you are the owner of this dog, or know who does own it, please let me know.

I know that most dog owners who live in the village behave responsibly and keep their dogs on leads and fit muzzles.  Clearly others do not and allow their dogs to chase deer and other animals.  Sadly for Shadow this savage attack is the distressing consequence of not controlling a dog such as this. 

This is the 8th occasion since the start of Lockdown in March that dogs have come into the paddock and “worried” our alpacas, and the second that we have lost in this way.  I have also had emails this week from neighbours who have witnessed the consequences of deer which have been attacked by a dog and suffered lingering but fatal consequences.

Please be a responsible owner and keep your dog under control.

NFDC’s draft waste strategy

Comments on NFDC’s draft waste strategy extended to Sunday 20 December

If you have not yet done so, please take a look at New Forest District Council’s draft waste strategy, which describes ways they are aiming to increase what can be recycled, and then tell them what you think at https://newforest.gov.uk/wastestrategy

Printed packs are also available from NFDC  information offices or by calling their customer services 023 8028 5000. And there is a printable version to download at https://newforest.gov.uk/wastestrategy

Caution urged as winter months set in for New Forest animal accidents

Commuters are urged to be vigilant as accidents involving animals in the Forest peak between 5pm and 8pm on weekdays in the winter months.

Low light, dazzling oncoming headlights and weather makes visibility poor. So it’s encouraged to slow down from 40mph to 30mph, a move which adds only three extra minutes to most journeys across the Forest but can drastically reduce accidents involving animals.

Last year, 159 New Forest animals – ponies, cattle, donkeys, pigs and sheep – were involved in collisions, with 58 killed and 32 injured.

Most drivers involved in animal accidents are relatively local people on regular trips. The high-risk routes have been identified as:

  • B3078/79 from Cadnam to Godshill
  • B3054 from Lymington to Dibden Purlieu
  • B3055 from Brockenhurst to Sway
  • C10 from Picket Post to Holmsley.

The New Forest’s Animal Accident Reduction Group organized a range of measures including police mobile speed cameras and reflective warning signs on dangerous routes.

Accidents involving livestock, are required by law to be reported to police as soon as possible. A reward of up to £5,000 is offered for information leading to the successful conviction of drivers prosecuted for failing to stop and report an accident involving a Forest animal.

How drivers can help:

  • be ready to stop – animals can step out even when they’ve seen you approaching.
  • drive slowly, especially at night – there is a pool of darkness behind the headlights of approaching cars – an animal may be standing in it.
  • give animals grazing by the side of the road a wide berth – cross to the other side of the road and be prepared to STOP.
  • grazing animals on both sides of the road? Take extra care as they may cross.
  • one animal by the roadside means others are close by.
  • bends and tops of hills need more care – animals may be standing in the road out of sight.
  • reflective collars worn by some ponies may help you see them in the dark – be aware not all livestock have them.
  • deer can easily jump the fences alongside roads like the A337, A31 and A35 – and when there is one deer more will usually follow.